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Students who are California residents pay in-state tuition of $46 per unit, whereas students who are non-residents pay out-of-state tuition of $395 per unit. (Note: Tuition fees are for the 2022-23 academic year.) Community college enrollment fees are set by the California State Legislature. All fees are subject to change.

The term "California resident" for fee purposes may differ from other definitions of California residency. A person who has a California driver's license and/or vehicle registration or who is a California resident for tax, voting, or welfare purposes may have established legal residence in the state but not necessarily be considered a resident for fee purposes.

Residency Eligibility

To be eligible for California residency, a student must do the following:

Learn about exemptions and special considerations.

How to Apply for Reclassification of Residency

We encourage students to start the residency reclassification process before they sign up for classes. If you don't pay your fees on time because you are trying to get in-state tuition, then you may be dropped from your classes.

Students can submit residency reclassification or appeals on initial residency determination online through your eServices account. To access these forms online:

  1. Log in to your eServices account.
  2. Click Student eForms and Petitions.
  3. Select Residency to bring up your form options.
  4. Click Start Residency Reclass/Appeal to begin.

Call Admissions and Records if you have questions:

  • Folsom Lake College Main Campus – Call (916) 608-6501
  • El Dorado Center – Call (530) 642-5644
  • Rancho Cordova Center – Call (916) 361-6321

Exemptions and Special Considerations

California regulations allow students who meet certain criteria to pay California resident fee rates even if they have not met the requirements of physical presence and intent to be a resident. To be considered under any of the following special provisions, you must meet the criteria listed.

AB 540, AB 2000, and SB 68 Exemption

Students who attended a California high school for at least three years and graduated or received a GED or certificate of completion may qualify for the AB 540, AB 2000, or SB 68 non-resident tuition exemption. Additional factors such as community college, elementary, middle, and adult school attendance in California may be considered in some circumstances.

If you meet the exemption criteria, then use the nonresident tuition exemption request form instead of the residency reclassification/appeal form. Students can submit AB 540 nonresident tuition exemption requests online through your eServices account. To access these forms online:

  1. Log in to your eServices account.
  2. Click Student eForms and Petitions.
  3. Select Residency to bring up your form options
  4. Click Start an AB-540 eForm to begin.

AB 343 Exemption

If you were admitted to the US under a Special Immigration Visa or as a refugee and you settled in California less than one year from the residency determination date, then you are eligible for exemption from paying the non-resident tuition fee for the length of time you live in California up to the minimum time necessary to become a resident. After this period has expired, recipients will be considered non-residents for tuition purposes and may attend as non-residents or request residency reclassification.

If you meet the exemption criteria, then use the nonresident tuition exemption request form instead of the residency reclassification/appeal form. Students can submit AB 343 nonresident tuition exemption requests online through your eServices account. To access these forms online:

  1. Log in to your eServices account.
  2. Click Student eForms and Petitions.
  3. Select Residency to bring up your form options
  4. Click Start an AB-343 eForm to begin.

Additional Information

California Residence Requirements for Minors

The residence of a minor (a person under 18 years of age) is determined in accordance with the following, per California Education Code and Title 5:

  1. The residence of the parent (natural or legally adoptive ) with whom an unmarried minor lives is the residence of that minor, regardless of the length of time the minor has resided with that parent. This rule applies equally to a minor whose parents have permanently separated.
  2. A married minor may establish their own residence. A minor who has married but thereafter divorced retains the capacity to establish their own residence. A minor whose marriage has been annulled must be treated as an unmarried minor since, for all intents and purposes, a marriage has not occurred.
  3. If the minor lives alone, they take the residence status of the parent with whom they last lived.
  4. If both parents are deceased and there is no court-appointed guardian, then the minor may establish residence as though they were an adult.
  5. The residence of an unmarried minor who has a living parent cannot be changed by the minor's own act, by the appointment of a legal guardian, or by relinquishment of a parent's right of control.
  6. A student who has been adult for less than a full year (is under 19 years of age) may under certain circumstances combine the immediate pre-majority derived California residence with the immediate post-majority California residence to satisfy the one year necessary for residency classification.

Financial Hardship

Financial hardship cannot be considered in evaluating California residency for the purpose of in-state fee eligibility.

Residency Status of a Spouse or Domestic Partner

A student cannot derive residency status from their spouse or domestic partner.